Category Archives: Selected Exhibitions

Houston Paintings

A selection of works exhibited at Art League Houston, March 22nd–May 4th, 2019.

In 2016, after moving to Houston, Texas from Auckland, New Zealand, my forays to local museum collections sparked a return to painting. Using photographic images from the book Houston’s Forgotten Heritage as a starting point, my paintings re-interpret the content of these historical images, and render new relationships to the present through my use of color. I went on to explore photographic images from other sources, including YouTube videos and children’s encyclopedias from the 1950s. My paintings employ the use of saturated color and meticulous techniques in a bid to tease out previously unnoticed details, to highlight the construction of the source images, or to emphasize the mythological or symbolic qualities that exist in the mundane. In these paintings, I use color and compositional elements in a non-natural way to jolt the viewer out of taking what they see for granted, nudging them to accept instability of history as told through photographic images.

To view all the works, along with their accompanying texts, go to www.houstonpaintings.website

Dreams Moons Circles Fictions

(and fragments found on the forest floor of disquietude)

A solo survey show of works (2003-2014) exhibited at the Papakura Art Gallery, Auckland, February 2014

For this exhibition, the projects A Humid Day and Untitled (White Book) were released as e-books.  

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A selection of works included in this solo survey show:

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images courtesy of Papakura Art Gallery.

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Click here for images of the opening on Papakura Art Gallery’s facebook page.

To download the e-books featured in the show, please follow this link for further information.
 

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Dreams-Circles-Moons-Fictions1

 

Published in conjunction with the exhibition Dreams Circles Moons Fictions and fragments found on the forest floor of disquietude held at Papakura Art Gallery in February 2014. For images click here.

An introduction by Tracey Williams, and a catalogue essay by Dr. Cathy Tuato’o Ross.

Resolution

Corban Estate Arts Centre, Auckland, August 2013

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Enkyklios

Blue Oyster Art Project Space, Dunedin, February 2013

Click here for the review on Eyecontact.

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Invocations

Melanie Roger Gallery, Auckland, April 2012

Flying Oblique, 2012.
Archival inkjet print, edition of 3

These are part of a series of works exploring issues in self-imaging that of an identity embedded in the flux of migration and its relationship to mass media, this piece captures what seems to be semi-private, fleeting moments in a studio filled with nameless odds and ends.

Disappearance scheduled for Friday and other works.

Disappearance scheduled for Friday and other works.

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Exhibited in Page Blackie Gallery and Melanie Roger Gallery 2011/2012

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Installation at Page Blackie Gallery, 2011.

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Of Positions and half Positions having several Marks at once

Of Positions and half Positions having several Marks at once

Gus Fisher Gallery, Auckland, September 2011

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Installation views.

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Exhibition catalogue with essay by Victoria Wynne-Jones can be downloaded here.

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Exportware

Photographic laser decals depicting a solitary woman in uncertain garb were fired onto found ceramic bowls. Alluding to trade routes of ceramics between Asia and Europe, this work speaks to the eventual migration of bodies from Asia to the rest of the world. Referencing Japanese souvenir ceramics in which an East Asian woman is drawn into a ceramic bowl, this work also recalls ancient incantation bowls on which Lilith, an ambiguous female archetype feared by some but also heralded as a symbol of female empowerment by feminist thinkers, appears.

Exhibited at Page Blackie Gallery, Wellington, November 2010 & in various places.

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Ceramic decal images. 


 

 

Found bowls with ceramic decals fired onto them, and painted over with acrylic.

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Installation views at Page Blackie Gallery

 

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Photographic laser decals depicting a solitary woman in uncertain garb were fired onto found ceramic bowls. Alluding to trade routes of ceramics between Asia and Europe, this work speaks to the eventual migration of bodies from Asia to the rest of the world. Referencing Japanese souvenir ceramics in which an East Asian woman is drawn into a ceramic bowl this work also recalls ancient incantation bowls on which Lilith, an ambiguous female archetype, feared by some but also heralded as a symbol of female empowerment by modern feminist thinkers, appears.

Associated essay by Vera Mey.